Taiwan Lecture Series - Sommersemester 2007

Chang Lung-chih: Taiwan History
Mei Chia-Ling: Taiwan Fiction
Termine

Chang Lung-chih (Academia Sinica): Taiwan History

Island of Histories: Six Excursions through Taiwanese History and Historiography

This lecture series attempts to offer a critical and comparative overview of contemporary Taiwanese historiography from the viewpoint of a practicing historian in Taiwan. Like many post-colonial societies, the revision of history in Taiwan has become a contested enterprise of collective memory and identity politics. The situation is further complicated by domestic and international politics of Taiwan’s problematic sovereignty and statehood.
Viewing Taiwan history as a bourgeoning intellectual field with vitality and innovations, the six lectures will offer a state of the field report of the “Taiwan-centered” history from historical and methodological perspectives. After introducing its multiple origins and paradigm shifts of Taiwanese historical study, I’ll discuss new directions and major achievements since the 1980s. I’ll analyze the ongoing debates on the question of colonial modernity and examine tensions between national and post-colonial conceptions of Taiwan history. The conclusion further reflects on the prospects of Taiwan historical study in a global age.

1. Re-imagining Community from Different Shores: Historical Revisionism in a Divided Democracy

2. Crossing the Great Divides: A Brief History of Taiwan Historical Writing, 1895-1975

3. Discovering History in Taiwan: the Emergence of a “Taiwan-Centered” History since the 1980s

4. Words and Things: Sources and Methods of Taiwan Historical Studies

5. From Modernization to Colonial Modernity: Issues and Debates in Taiwanese Historiography

6. Taiwan Unbound: In Search of New Island History in a Global Age

Mei Chia-Ling (National Taiwan University): Taiwan Fiction 

“Young Taiwan: Youth Imaginary and National Discourse in Twentieth Century Fiction from Taiwan”

This lecture series explores twentieth-century fiction from Taiwan, starting from the double perspectives of “Youth imaginary” and “National discourse.” “Youth” is the golden period of one’s life, often associated with vigor, new life, and hope. Ever since the late Qing and Liang Qichao’s motion of “Young China,” it has become a powerful symbol in the imagination of national renaissance. Accordingly, twentieth-century Chinese fiction has time and again depicted the youth in its quest for adulthood, using it as a metaphor for the nation’s searching a path of development. “Youth imaginary” and “National discourse” are thus deeply interwoven and interacting in literary praxis. Taiwan, however, under Japanese colonial rule for fifty years, has come up with both literary forms and a development trajectory of its own and unique bearing. The lecture series focuses on this point; the six lectures analyze literary “Youth imaginary” and “National discourse,” in order to illuminate step by step the development of twentieth-century Taiwan fiction and its related issues. The first two lectures address fiction written during the era of Japanese rule, while lectures three to six are devoted to fiction from the post-war period; the problems addressed include space,
identity, the body, writing, gender politics, and modernist literature.

1. Where is (s)he going? The quest of the youth in Taiwan fiction from the colonial period

2. Body politics and youth imaginary: A Taiwanese body, or the emperor’s body?

3. Youthful modernity and young literature: The theme of growing up in modernist literature and the nativist turn

4. National imagination and the politics of writing: Soldiers’ commune fiction during the 1980’s and 1990’s

5. Youth and Taipei in Pai Hsien-yung’s novels: From Taipei People to Crystal Boys

6. Orphan? Crystal boy? Wild child? – The father/son/family/nation relationship and its breakdown in post-war Taiwan fiction

Termine:

July 9

09:00-11:00

Intro Session

Mei

 

11:00-13:00

Intro Session

Chang

 

14:00-16:00

Public Lecture 1

Mei

Where is (s)he going? The quest of the youth in Taiwan fiction from the colonial period

16:00-18:00

Public Lecture 1

Chang

Re-imagining Community from Different Shores: Historical Revisionism in a Divided Democracy

July 10

09:00-11:00

Session 2

Mei

 

11:00-13:00

Session 2

Chang

 

14:00-16:00

Public Lecture 2

Chang

Crossing the Great Divides: A Brief History of Taiwan Historical Writing, 1895-1975

16:00-18:00

Public Lecture 2

Mei

Body politics and youth imaginary: A Taiwanese body, or the emperor’s body?

July 16

09:00-11:00

Session 3

Mei

 

11:00-13:00

Session 3

Chang

 

14:00-16:00

Public Lecture 3

Mei

Youthful modernity and young literature: The theme of growing up in modernist literature and the nativist turn

16:00-18:00

Public Lecture 3

Chang

Discovering History in Taiwan: the Emergence of a “Taiwan-Centered” History since the 1980s

July 17

09:00-11:00

Session 4

Mei

 

11:00-13:00

Session 4

Chang

 

14:00-16:00

Public Lecture 4

Chang

Words and Things: Sources and Methods of Taiwan Historical Studies

16:00-18:00

Public Lecture 4

Mei

National imagination and the politics of writing: Soldiers’ commune fiction during the 1980’s and 1990’s

July 23

09:00-11:00

Session 5

Mei

 

11:00-13:00

Session 5

Chang

 

14:00-16:00

Public Lecture 5

Mei

Youth and Taipei in Pai Hsien-yung’s novels: From Taipei People to Crystal Boys

16:00-18:00

Public Lecture 5

Chang

From Modernization to Colonial Modernity: Issues and Debates in Taiwanese Historiography

July 24

09:00-11:00

Session 6

Mei

 

11:00-13:00

Session 6

Chang

 

14:00-16:00

Public Lecture 6

Chang

Taiwan Unbound: In Search of New Island History in a Global Age

16:00-18:00

Public Lecture 6

Mei

Orphan? Crystal boy? Wild child? – The father/son/family/nation relationship and its breakdown in post-war Taiwan fiction

 

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Letzte Änderung: 27.08.2014
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